Syllabus

The MyESO competition is meant to prepare students for the upcoming International Earth Science Olympiad each year. As such, the syllabus that is covered in MyESO is comprehensive and covers the essence of knowledge students need to know in order to take part in the competition.

Main Topics

Geology is the study of the earth, the materials of which it is made, the structure of those materials, and the processes acting upon them. It includes the study of organisms that have inhabited our planet. An important part of geology is the study of how earth’s materials, structures, processes and organisms have changed over time.

Geophysics is the application of physics to study the earth, oceans, atmosphere and near-earth space. It is a broad subject that encompasses many of the major sciences – physics, astronomy, planetary science, geology, environmental science, oceanography, and meteorology. Many different scientists from different disciplines class themselves as geophysicists, including seismologists, meteorologists, glaciologists, geomagnetists and geodesists.

Oceanography is the study of the physical, chemical, and biological features of the ocean, including the ocean’s ancient history, its current condition, and its future. In a time when the ocean is threatened by climate change and pollution, coastlines are eroding, and entire species of marine life are at risk of extinction, the role of oceanographers may be more important now than it has ever been. 

Astronomy is the scientific study of celestial objects (such as stars, planets, comets, and galaxies) and phenomena that originate outside the earth’s atmosphere (such as the cosmic background radiation). It is concerned with the evolution, physics, chemistry, meteorology, and motion of celestial objects, as well as the formation and development of the universe. Astronomy is one of the oldest sciences.

Meteorology is the scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting.Meteorological phenomena are observable weather events which illuminate and are explained by the science of meteorology. Those events are bound by the variables that exist in Earth’s atmosphere.